Find & view all Saskatoon MLS listings within 1KM of your iPhone or Android

If you’re a real estate geek with an iPhone or an Android device you’re going to flip over this terrific little application.

It uses your device’s GPS to position you on a map and it plots all Saskatoon MLS listings within one kilometer of your current location.

Have you ever driven by a real estate for sale sign and thought to yourself, “Hey, I wonder what the deal is on that place?” Well, wonder no more my friend, wonder no more. Just pull out your phone, open the bookmark and browse the listing details including all of the MLS photos and dozens of data fields.

It will continue to search nearby listings as you “pan” the map and it can “follow” you as you walk or drive and automatically update the search results.

If you see something you’d like to visit, you can call us or send us a text message directly from the listing.

It’s a web-based application so it requires no installation and it takes up virtually no room on your phone’s hard disk.

Simply open this link with your iPhone or your Android, bookmark it, and you’re experiencing the magic, now and forever.

But please, don’t keep this gem to yourself. Email it to all of your iPhone and Android friends (you can use that little blue email icon at the bottom of this post to forward it on). They’ll love you for it.

I’m always happy to answer your Saskatoon real estate questions.  All of my contact info is here. Please feel free to call or email.

Follow our daily updates on Twitter @Norm_Fisher.

Norm Fisher
Royal LePage Saskatoon Real Estate

This application is brought to me by MyRealPage, the most kick-ass home search tool for MLS listings on planet earth, perhaps in the solar system.

Discriminatory real estate ad attracts media attention

This post makes the “just for fun” category for the featured video’s surprise ending. If you start the video, please see it through to the end.

By way of Brendan King’s Twitter stream.

As a licensed Asian, I found this particular misunderstanding quite amusing and so did the other Asians in my office, but discriminatory practices are no laughing matter and fair treatment for all human beings is a cornerstone of a civilized society.

The Saskatchewan Human Rights Code was written to protect people from discriminatory practices. The following are “prohibited grounds” for discrimination under the Code;

(i) religion;
(ii) creed;
(iii) marital status;
(iv) family status;
(v) sex;
(vi) sexual orientation;
(vii) disability;
(viii) age;
(ix) colour;
(x) ancestry;
(xi) nationality;
(xii) place of origin;
(xiii) race or perceived race; and
(xiv) receipt of public assistance.

Section 10 and section 11 of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Code deal specifically with discriminatory practices in the sale or leasing of real estate.

Discrimination in the purchase of property prohibited

10(1) No person shall, on the basis of a prohibited ground:

(a) deny to any person or class of persons the opportunity to purchase any commercial unit or any place of dwelling that is advertised or in any way represented as being available for sale;

(b) deny to any person or class of persons the opportunity to purchase or otherwise acquire land or an interest in land; or

(c) discriminate against any person or class of persons with respect to any term of the purchase or other acquisition of any commercial unit or any place of dwelling, land or any interest in land.

(2) Repealed. 2007, c.39, s.4.

(3) Nothing in subsection (1) prohibits the sale, the offering for sale or the advertising for sale of a place of dwelling for occupancy by persons over 55 years of age exclusively.

Discrimination in occupancy of commercial unit or housing accommodation is prohibited

11(1) No person, directly or indirectly, alone or with another, or by the interposition of another shall, on the basis of a prohibited ground:

(a) deny to any person or class of persons occupancy of any commercial unit or any housing accommodation; or

(b) discriminate against any person or class of persons with respect to any term of occupancy of any commercial unit or any housing accommodation.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to discrimination on the basis of the sex of a person with respect to housing accommodation, where the occupancy of all the housing accommodation in a building, except that of the owner or the owner’s family, is restricted to individuals who are of the same sex.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply to discrimination on the basis of the sex or sexual orientation of a person with respect to the renting or leasing of any dwelling unit in any housing accommodation that is composed of not more than two dwelling units, where the owner of the housing accommodation or the owner’s family resides in one of the two dwelling units.

(4) Nothing in subsection (1) prohibits the renting or leasing, the offering for rent or lease or the advertising for rent or lease, of any housing accommodation for occupancy by persons over 55 years of age exclusively.

The Saskatchewan Human Rights Code is here.

I’m always happy to answer your Saskatoon real estate questions.  All of my contact info is here. Please feel free to call or email.

Follow our daily updates on Twitter @Norm_Fisher.

Norm Fisher
Royal LePage Saskatoon Real Estate

Buyer sues agent for letting them pay too much for a home

Buyer sues agent for letting them pay too much for a home“Marty Ummel feels she paid too much for her house. So do millions of other people who bought at the peak of the housing boom.


“What makes Ms. Ummel different is that she is suing her agent, saying it was all his fault.”


I came by this story from today’s New York Times by way of the 1000 Watt Blog, one of my favorite daily stops.


Naturally, I can’t speak to the facts of this particular case and it’s my guess that it will be a difficult argument to make. However, the story should serve as a reminder to agents that there is more to representing a client than finding them a home and putting a contract together.


Ultimately, we are responsible to “protect and promote the interests” of our client. If they’re offering to pay more than market value, they have a right to know it. They depend on us to tell them the truth.


Nobody can predict the direction of a real estate market with absolute certainty, yet almost daily I hear from people who claim that a Saskatoon real estate agent has told them that prices are going to go through the roof this spring. Just three weeks ago, one agent stood in my office and relayed portions of a conversation he had with a buyer. “This house will be worth $X by spring. I guarantee it!”


“Hmmm…and I think you just did guarantee it.”


If your agent is using this kind of language, he or she may be either ignorant or reckless. I could be wrong, but it’s worth thinking about. 🙂


The full New York Times story is here.

I’m always happy to answer your Saskatoon real estate questions.  All of my contact info is here. Please feel free to call or email.

Follow our daily updates on Twitter @SaskatoonHomes.

Norm Fisher
Royal LePage Saskatoon Real Estate

Buying real estate in Phoenix, Arizona – From the beagle's mouth

Buying Real Estate in Phoenix, Arizona - From the Beagle's Mouth

Over the past several months a number of my past clients have asked me about real estate opportunities in the U.S. The rising dollar, combined with reduced prices in some beautiful U.S. cities has many Canadians considering a purchase in their favorite vacation spot. A friend of mine from Phoenix recently asked if he could share some information about buying property south of the border, so I jumped at the opportunity to have him as my guest. I’d like you to meet Jonathan Dalton, and his partner, Toby. J

Greetings from Phoenix!

I’m Jonathan Dalton from RE/MAX Desert Showcase and Dalton’s Arizona Homes Blog. Norm was nice enough to let me drop in and talk directly to you folks and I’m quite appreciative. As I write we’re in the middle of a cold snap – it’s down to 53 degrees here, which translates to somewhere around 12 Celsius. But that sounds much colder than it should so I’m going to stick to 53.

One of the big stories of real estate down here in the Valley of the Sun is the surge in Canadians looking to purchase second homes here, usually for themselves and sometimes as seasonal rentals (even though the high season is the same time of year someone from the land of snow probably would rather be here.) I’ve spent most of the last six months acquainting folks from Alberta and Saskatchewan with the Phoenix area and some of the particulars of buying homes down here.

There seem to be a lot of seminars up there telling people what they need to know about buying in the United States, though it seems like the seminars really work out best for the hosts collecting the checks at the door. The basic information’s good but there’s a lot of small stuff you ought to know before you buy in the United States and the Phoenix area in particular.

With any luck (and possibly a bribe or two) Norm will let me write about these in a little more depth sometime. But here are some basic things you should know:

1) The Phoenix real estate market is big. It’s really big. From Surprise in the northwest to Queen Creek in the southeast is somewhere around 65 miles one way. It’s hard narrowing down the search so …

2) Know what you like to do. If you’re into golf (which we do year-round here), golf is everywhere. If you want to watch hockey, come to the West Valley. If you like off-Broadway productions stay closer to Arizona State University in Tempe. What you like to do will impact where you ought to look.

3) Speaking of such things, Queen Creek is in a different county than Phoenix. We’re in Maricopa. Queen Creek is in Pinal. Property taxes are far higher in Pinal County than in Maricopa. The local paper ran an article about Canadians buying in Florence which is even further south than Queen Creek. Not sure if the sales agent ever mentioned taxes.

4) And on that note, don’t go into a new build without representation. Agents at new builds will tell you what they have to tell you but not necessarily everything that you might need to know.

5) Lastly, financing isn’t nearly as complicated as it seems … if you find a lender who knows what they’re doing with Canadian buyers.

Timing is an interesting concept from what I’ve seen with my clients. Not only are you guessing the direction of the local market but you’re also gambling on the currency exchange. A small decline in the Phoenix real estate market actually could be less costly than a drop in the loony. With our dollars at parity, that seems to be the main reason folks are looking more than normal.

I’ve got a penchant for rambling as you’ll discover if you visit my blog so I’ll wrap this up here. Hopefully I didn’t wear out my welcome and I’ll be back again. Thanks much for allowing me to interrupt and I now return you to Saskatchewan real estate news already in progress.

The ethics of “bidding” for Saskatoon real estate

The ethics of bidding for Saskatoon real estateI came across an interesting “Letter to the Editor” in yesterday’s Star Phoenix which I wanted to touch on. The letter was submitted by Maureen Shebelski, a Saskatoon resident and mother.


Maureen’s decrial of the current state of the Saskatoon real estate market is a testimonial to her social conscience and it’s obvious that her concerns are sincere at every level. She points to the challenges and consequences which are inevitable in a market that experiences such rapid and significant change. Rising property taxes and insurance rates, increasing levels of debt, and uncertainty about the future are all things which are on Maureen’s mind right now.


I share many of the concerns which she expressed. I am also a parent, and coincidentally I have one daughter and one son, both young adults, so I’ve spent lots of time considering how this “new Saskatoon” will affect them. I’m also keenly aware that there are many residents in this fine city who will face challenges which will dwarf those that my own kids might experience as a result of this “boom.”


Maureen also takes the opportunity to place a little blame for what’s going on, starting with Premier Lorne Calvert and wrapping up with the real estate industry. She says, “I also blame the real estate industry and its new method of taking bids on houses, instead of taking offers. When my father was in real estate, there were some ethics involved. I don’t see that now.”


This attempt to “blame the real estate industry” and suggest that there is something unethical about “the new method of taking bids” would be easy enough for most to agree with, particularly those who are facing the challenge of buying a home in this market. Ultimately, it demonstrates a lack of understanding as to the role of a “seller’s agent” in the real estate transaction.


Since it is “ethics” which are questioned here, let’s take a look at some of the ethical guidelines which may apply from the Canadian Real Estate Association’s Code of Ethics which all REALTORS® are sworn to uphold.


Article 3 – Primary Duty to Client – A REALTOR® shall protect and promote the interests of his or her client. This primary obligation does not relieve the REALTOR® of the responsibility of dealing fairly with all parties to a transaction (Also appears in provincial statutory legislation in the Saskatchewan Real Estate Commission Bylaws, section 702).


Article 12 – A REALTOR® shall render a skilled and conscientious service, in conformity with the standards of competence which are reasonable expected in the specific real estate disciplines in which the REALTOR® engages.


Article 18 – The business of a REALTOR® shall be conducted in strict accordance with all statutory and regulatory requirements.


Ethics and statutory regulation aside, we have volumes of agency law decisions which define an agent’s obligations to his or her client. Agency law provides a history of expectations which are considered reasonable and holds an agent accountable and liable for damages which result from a failure to act as a fiduciary to the person or persons who have hired them. In its simplest form, the agency relationship is founded on obedience, confidentiality, competence, disclosure, accountability, trust and loyalty.


Finally, the listing agreement used in Saskatchewan binds a seller’s agent to the following promises to his or her client;

  • obey the seller’s instructions on the Exclusive Seller’s Brokerage Contract and all lawful instructions of the seller;
  • represent the seller’s best interests;
  • fully disclose known facts which might influence the seller’s decision;
  • maintain confidentiality of personal and financial information discussed with the seller even after the Exclusive Seller’s Brokerage Contract expires;
  • safeguard the seller’s documents and money; and
  • exercise reasonable care and diligence.

I expect that most people do understand that multiple offers on a property most likely places the seller in the best possible position to negotiate a favorable price and terms. Given that are bound by a Code of Ethics, statutory law, agency law and our promise in writing to act with complete loyalty to the seller, how is it that we are viewed as “unethical” for making as many prospective buyers as possible aware that a client’s home is for sale? I would suggest that failing to make every effort to deliver the best result for a client would be unethical and unlawful.


Discussions which I’ve had with Al Jacobsen, Registrar of the Saskatchewan Real Estate Commission and with Randy Katzman, a local real estate lawyer suggest that agents who fail to provide adequate exposure for a client’s property could be subject to both prosecution and civil litigation with potential consequences including large fines, license suspension or cancellation, and damages which might result from that negligence. Personally, I’m not much into any of that.


Every time that a seller’s home is sold without a reasonable level of exposure to the market, a betrayal is committed. Every time an agent brings a seller’s property to the market and provides buyers with reasonable access, a promise is fulfilled. Seller’s benefit and so does the community of Saskatoon real estate buyers.


Please don’t call the Saskatoon real estate community unethical for doing right by its sellers. They pay us a hefty chunk of change for representation and they deserve to get exactly what they’ve paid for; obedience, confidentiality, competence, disclosure, accountability, trust and loyalty. Acting as one’s agent is an honour and a privilege that should be taken seriously.


Read also: Deceptive agent practice could cost sellers money

Read also: Who is your real estate agent looking out for?

Read also: Premium Saskatoon homes sell while market is still at work

I’m always happy to answer your Saskatoon real estate questions.  All of my contact info is here. Please feel free to call or email.

Follow our daily updates on Twitter @SaskatoonHomes.

Norm Fisher
Royal LePage Saskatoon Real Estate